Halle Berry And Skin Color In Hollywood

 

Halle Berry And Skin Color In Hollywood

Chance: Actress Halle Berry said that because she is black, it is harder for her to convince movie studios that she is right for particular movie parts (roles). It is a know fact that movie studios use to heavily discriminate against what type of role a black actor or actress could play. Blacks in general have played roles that have been viewed as black type roles some of this discrimination still exist. Halle said things are slowly changing.

Halle has won an Oscar and an Golden Globe and even with these accomplishments under her belt she stills has to prove that she is fit to be considered to play certain roles. Halle is very talented, intelligent, and beautiful but these things have not totally gained her all the other various roles that she can play. Halle Berry is bi racial her mother is white and her father is black.

The reason that Halle Berry is not given more roles is because she has a phenotype that is considered and stereotyped black. Her facial features are mixed race, and her skin tone is what is really keeping her from being given more parts. Her skin tone is a nice caramel brown but this tone is considered black. Halle’s facial features are European. I admire Halle for not being scared to speak out in public about the race issues in Hollywood. Now notice Vin Diesel does not have this problem he has played all kinds of roles. Mariah Carey would not have this problem to the same degree either.

Vin and Mariah have phenotypes that are not stereotyped black. Vin Disel, Wentworth Miller, Mariah Carey, and Halle Berry all have black fathers and white mothers. The difference is that Halle’s skin tone came out looking more black and Wentworth, Vin, and Mariah’s skin tone came out looking more white. The actor Giancarlo Esposito has a black American mother and an Italian father but Giancarlo’s skin tone is Caramel brown and he is considered black. bi racials who do not have whitish, yellowish, or beige skin tones will find that it is harder to prove that are fit to play roles that traditionally are played by white actors and actresses. Actress Jennifer Beals has a black father and white mother but she looks white in skin tone, and Jennifer has played various roles in a lot of movies, and actor Jay Davidson has a black father from Ghana, Africa and a white mother but Jay looks white. Jay Davidson played in the movie stargate he was the alien named RA in that movie.

An actor or actresses phenotype (physical appearance) plays a role in what parts they will be allowed to play. This is gradually changing. Like I said I admire Halle for speaking out about this issue.

 

Color still a barrier in Hollywood says Halle Berry

Thursday, October 11, 2007

By Michelle Nichols

 

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Actress Halle Berry may have won an Oscar, but she says she is frustrated at still having to convince movie studios of her ability because she is black.

 

"It doesn’t matter that I have an Oscar, an Emmy, a Golden Globe and a Silver (Berlin) Bear," Berry, who is pregnant with her first child, said during an interview at a Manhattan hotel to promote her new movie "Things We Lost in the Fire."

 

"I shouldn’t have had to try so hard to be considered. I should have to stop convincing studios I am right for it — it should be on my acting merit," she said.

 

Berry was the first black woman to win an Academy Award for best actress, winning the 2002 Oscar for "Monster’s Ball."

 

In her latest film she plays Audrey Burke, a widowed mother of two who asks her husband’s friend, Jerry Sunborne, to live with them. She helps him overcome heroin addiction while Sunborne, played by Benicio Del Toro, helps her come to terms with her husband’s death.

 

Berry said her first question when she met the film’s Danish director, Susanne Bier, was: "Do you care that I am black because this wasn’t written for a black woman … I think this might be my problem here."

 

She said that Bier’s response was, "To hell with what color you are, it doesn’t matter."

 

But Bier was an exception. In the movie industry, Berry said, race is "always an issue — slowly it’s changing."  

 

"Not having a chance is what I can’t live with at this point in my career, I think I have earned that," she said.

 

MOTHER NO. 1 ROLE

 

The Hollywood Reporter even noted the casting of Berry and Hispanic Del Toro for "Things We Lost in the Fire."

 

"In going for the best actors, Bier has put together a racially mixed cast with Halle Berry and Benicio Del Toro in roles that were undoubtedly written as white. What a refreshing change," the trade magazine wrote.

 

For the moment, the 41-year-old actress is concentrating on becoming a mother, something she said filming "Things We Lost in the Fire" helped her realize she was ready for.

 

"Somehow through playing Audrey and having such close connection with the children and dealing with the children as a mother I realized … this was something that I was really meant to do," Berry said.

 

"I needed that in my life, like I needed the air to breathe."

 

But Berry says that she would like to get back to work as quickly as possible because by the time her baby with model Gabriel Aubry is born she will have had two years off. "I am already going a little batty," she said.

 

Her next job, Berry said, is likely to be "Tulia" with director John Singleton, which she said was postponed after her pregnancy began to show earlier than expected.

 

"Things We Lost in the Fire" opens in U.S. theaters on October 19.

 


  1. Elle

    I don’t see anything wrong with a studio deciding that a black face is not right for a certain part.

  2. Chance

    Quote: I don’t see anything wrong with a studio deciding that a black face is not right for a certain part.

    I agree because there are parts that many non blacks don’t get that are given to blacks, and there are parts that are given to any actor or actress regardless of race.

  3. Vanilla Phoenix

    I read somewhere that Halle is slated to play a White role in an upcoming flick…perhaps compensation for the Jolie fiasco?

  4. Keita

    Halle did get a stereotypical role. That xxx rated scene she did not Billy Bob. I lost respect for her after that. Some want to say that it’s only acting. NO! It’s everyday stereo typing. People, consciensly and subconscously will say that’s how they are. It’s living up to white people’s labels. Halles confused just like many mixed people. On top of that Halle got an award for acting out sterotypical whorish behavior. White folks love it.

  5. Vanilla Phoenix

    what’s cool about Halle is that she’s diverse—she can be fab [i.e. 007/Razorfish] or Skanky [Jungle Fever/Billy Bob]—don’t hate, appreciate…she’s also learning French for her Man & Baby!—GO HALLE!!!

  6. Chance

    Keita said: Halle did get a stereotypical role. That xxx rated scene she did not Billy Bob. I lost respect for her after that. Some want to say that it’s only acting. NO! It’s everyday stereo typing. People, consciensly and subconscously will say that’s how they are. It’s living up to white people’s labels. Halles confused just like many mixed people. On top of that Halle got an award for acting out sterotypical whorish behavior. White folks love it.

    My response:
    I see what you are saying here, and I understand why you say what you said. You are right many people especially many black people viewed Halle Berry as acting in as stereotypical black woman who is very sexually promiscuous and sexually unchaste. It is true that there were people who felt in their subconscious minds and consciously that Halle played the role of an unchaste black woman. Some black people and I feel certain other people from other ethnic groups lost respect for Halle. Halle was one of the few black actress who was main stream and she did not do nude scenes that exposed her breast or body totally, when she did that scene with Billy Bob Thornton many felt she had lowered herself and lost some respect for her.

    yes it is good that Halle is learning French to teach to her baby, I wish her well.

  7. Elle

    Halle did get a stereotypical role. That xxx rated scene she did not Billy Bob. I lost respect for her after that. Some want to say that it’s only acting. NO! It’s everyday stereo typing. People, consciensly and subconscously will say that’s how they are. It’s living up to white people’s labels. Halles confused just like many mixed people. On top of that Halle got an award for acting out sterotypical whorish behavior. White folks love it.

    Stereotypes are on average true. There’s no such thing as perpetuating a stereotype because it already exists socially, or else people wouldn’t all believe the same things about the same set of people. Besides it takes two to tango. If you understand the movie in its complexity you will see that it is supposed to play off of the Jezebel image, with the white southerner and change it, by having the white southerner abandon his racist dad and by the black girl a car.

  8. Chance

    I think what many people thought in their minds was that such a movie role (monster’s ball) was beneath Halle Berry’s dignity. They were shocked that she accepted the role to lay this black Jezebel. Yes it is true that on average stereotypes are true, this something I have been criticized for saying (that stereotypes on average are true).

  9. Honey

    Keita (#4) said: “Halles confused just like many mixed people.”

    What I want to know is, are you an authority on the psyche of mixed people?

    I’m mixed and the only thing I’m confused about is your inept statement.

  10. More accurately

    CORRECTION:

    “Berry was the first Mulatto woman to win an Academy Award for best actress, winning the 2002 Oscar for ‘Monster’s Ball.'”

  11. Chance

    I agree she was the first mulatta to win an oscar!

  12. Denise

    Halle Berry was the first person of African descent to win an Oscar, people of Caucasian descent have been winning it for years. Her white heritage already won an Oscar. What Halle Berry thinks of herself is all that matters, she thinks of herself as a black woman, that is what think she is, she said it, so what. She is carrying a white man’s baby in her womb so apparently she takes her white heritage into consideration as well.

    I disagree that Halle is facing discrimination at the level she claims she does. Most of the roles she play is written for white women, and she get those roles. Halle because of her lighter skin and European features, receive much better opportunities in Hollywood versus someone who has chocolate to medium brown skin. The people who receive the most discrimination in Hollywood are darker skinned Latinos, take Actress Zoe Saldana for example. Zoe is Dominican, they would rather cast Jennifer Lopez for a Latina role than Zoe Saldana. Zoe is subjected to play African American roles because she is a Latino of African descent.

  13. Chance

    Yes Halle is the first mixed race woman (mulatta) of African descent to win an Oscar, that is true. One thing about being mixed race is that you can claim one than one race if you want to, and reap the benefits of it like Halle Berry does. This is sign of smartness, man I enjoy being a mulatto. I hope Halle has a healthy baby. And, yes it is true that Halle does get roles sometimes that are made for white women. I think her biggest complain was that she had to put too much effort into proving that she is worthy for the role to be given to her.

  14. Marisol

    Chance,
    Chance,

    Halle is one of very few actresses of African descent and the best known. Her complexion isn’t impeding her race is. What roles are here for any black actress? Are there better known darker skinned actresses getting roles out there made for african fenotypes? There aren’t any. Halle’s all we got negra, mulatta or cambuja! Somehow it’s acceptable to be black man, but a dark black women in the movies as we say in New York Forget about it! Wake up and smell the cafe au lait!

  15. Chance

    Marisol: Halle is one of very few actresses of African descent and the best known. Her complexion isn’t impeding her race is. What roles are here for any black actress? Are there better known darker skinned actresses getting roles out there made for african fenotypes? There aren’t any. Halle’s all we got negra, mulatta or cambuja! Somehow it’s acceptable to be black man, but a dark black women in the movies as we say in New York Forget about it! Wake up and smell the cafe au lait!

    My response: Marisol in the case with Halle Berry race is connected to her skin color, how else could her race be impeding her. Just like with dark skin black women their skin color is impeding them because it is perceived as being black (black race). Yes Halle is currently all we got she is a mixed race woman a mulatta, who is bi racial and says that she is bi racial, and she claims black too, and the father of who future first child is white. So she gets the best of all worlds, and it has a lot to do with her being bi racial a mulatta.

  16. Marisol

    I will need a miner’s helmet and pick axe to find my way through your logic.

  17. Honey

    AGAIN: “Berry was the first “Mulatta” woman to win an Academy Award for best actress…”

    I read on a certain blog that the dark-skinned blacks refuse to let the Mulattos go (and be our own group); and I now see why — this is a perfect example of why: By holding on to us (Mulattos), blacks can claim higher numbers…, for example, they can claim to have won an Academy Award, when in fact a Mulatta woman won the Award, but they stubbornly want her to claim that she is “black”. Where does that leave her Mother?

    I wish that the blogger, “Kahlil” was on here. Like Chance, he’s on point every time!

  18. Marisol

    I wish Halle and her gorgeous man and their baby all the best. She claimed to win the Oscar as the first black woman. No one held a gun to her head! She said this freely. What is it exactly is it that you think black folks have done to you people? I’m Cuban and Puerto Rican and a Mulatta, I guess. I usely don’t speak in those terms. But I don’t have any of these issues. Africa gave us the culture that we are proud of, every Cuban knows this.

  19. Valerie

    As once stated by a great Chancellor,

    “Let people be mixed and classify themselves as ‘mixed’ instead of black or white since they look like both. Saying that they are black only, and not allowing them to claim white publicly — and therefore mixed — is an insult to their white heritage and white ancestors.”

    (Like you, Chance, I enjoy being Mulatto too!)

  20. Chance

    African And European cutural influences

    Marisol wrote: I wish Halle and her gorgeous man and their baby all the best. She claimed to win the Oscar as the first black woman. No one held a gun to her head! She said this freely. What is it exactly is it that you think black folks have done to you people? I’m Cuban and Puerto Rican and a Mulatta, I guess. I usely don’t speak in those terms. But I don’t have any of these issues. Africa gave us the culture that we are proud of, every Cuban knows this.

    My response: In the United states of America, the culture that black American have was given to them by whites. Most of the things, customs, habits, that black culture has came from white culture. Whites gave blacks their culture after slavery, when blacks left slavery all they was a slave culture. Even the slave culture was heavily influenced by white culture.

    Culture is made up of language, food, music, folklore, religion, written and unwritten rule of society, laws, family relationships, friends, philosophy about life and situations, etc White Americans gave black Americans most of their culture there is very little African cultural influence among black Americans of today. Blacks have more of a white American European culture, because a lot of white American culture came from Europe. Maybe one of the few things that black Americans have that is theirs is music and folklore. Some people might even say that is questionable. But music and folklore does comes across as black American originated.

    In Spanish speaking countries and Brazil ( Brazil is a Portuguese speaking country) the African cultural influence and traditions can be found more. Some forms of Africa culture are practice by Latinos and Brazilians but still they culture has more Spaniard and Portuguese cultural traditions than African. A lot of the African cultural influences that I see in those Latino countries and Brazil is music, food, voodoo, Santeria (cuban voodoo type religion), superstitions, African type religious traditions, witch craft, certain words and dancing.

    Marisol your intellectual logic about history is flawed.

  21. Chance

    Thanks valerie!!!

  22. Marisol

    What’s your point? Of course Latin culture, is a blend who doesn’t know that, it includes Amerind influences also, don’t forget los indios. But we in the Spanish Caribbean have retained the exact musical rythms and food and cultural practice that, though creolized, can be traced directly back to west and central Africa and specific areas in Spain. A lot of the African retention, from 500 years ago, is due to our religious practices and the reintroduction of those religions in the period immeadiately following slavery. There continue to be people with family ties among people in Lagos, Nigeria and similary in Mozambique etc. among the Brazilians. I am not saying that we are African only. We are proud of that heritage. By the way among our spanish forefathers there are divisions based on where they originated in Spain. My grandfather was a Gallego from Galicia and therefore had certain cultural practices that my family still retains. African culture has been retained in the so called New World even languages from African. If you’d like to know how some of this culture is in practice throughout the Americas including the US, read Dr. Robert Ferris Thompson of Yale University and Daniel Dawson and independent scholar and many others with whom I’ve studied. Dr. Thompson is an enlightened scholar who gives credit where it is due.

  23. Marisol

    BTW Valerie What’s intellectual logic??? And calling religions from Africa and the Americas superstitions is biased. Throughout the Americas there are religions of African and Native American origins that predate Christianity. The Kechua in the andes and the religion of Sioux in the US are only two examples. Santeria, a religion of Yuruba and Kongo origin is one of the fastest growing in the United States. In Latin America these religions were syncretized under other faiths like Catholcism and some of the ecstatic Protestand faiths. Vodoo has origins in what is current day Benin as Vodu. While it is considered a seperate faith, it shares some practices from Santeria. The languages of some of these faiths have been retained as part of the ritual like the practice of cooking the food of the gods. Dishes like black eyed peas and the peas themeselves have an African origin. One case in particular is a steamed dish popular in Brazil that is identical in name and preparation to its Nigerian conterpart. After slavery priests were able to travel to Brazil and Cuba, bringing with them the sacred plants from Africa. Previously substitues were used. Several became wealthy from the trade in plants from the motherland, such was the demand for them. Communities of “Brazilians” and “Cubans” returned to Nigeria. Their descendants live in communities there with names like Silva and Rodrigues. Recently a Nigerian freind of mine from the Brazilian community, an art historian visited Cuba, she was welcomed an honored for being a Yoruba. Other examples of African retentions are the structure of African American quilts which share many of the properties of west African strip weaving as do the textiles of Suriname, Dutch Guyana. The Surinamese in general have kept much of their African heritage. In the US the etymology of certain words can be traced to west and central Africa, the cadence and rythms of the blues, gospel and jazz also. The voice of Modernist America literature as practiced by Faulkner et al is said to have been inluenced by the vernacular language of African American retaining these rythms in their speach. See infleunce goes both ways. In discussions about ebonics the point is made that it is the grammar of West African language that is responsible for things like the use of double negatives. Gumbo is from a similar word in Africa for okra as is banjo and jazz and several others. And the gestures and signifiers of African culture are thought to have influenced practices as diverse as the tango and the way African Amerucans play basketball. Meeting force with resistance as it is demosntrated in Capoeira, Afro-Kongo martial arts in Brazil, shares a connection with the way in which basketball players dodge their opponents. The list goes on representing every area of human endeavor. You can’t seperate people from their culture.

  24. Marisol

    Sorry, to keep adding but. Black Athena, a book based on the work of German scholars of antiquity traces the African origins of classical european culture (Greco-Roman) to Africa.

  25. Chance

    Marisol,

    Thanks you for your comments based upon the history of African cultural influences in the western world. Have you ever read any of Ivan Van sertima, J.A. Rogers, and Runoko Rashidi? They wrote about African influences in various countries around the world also.

  26. Marisol

    Yes, I’ve read them.

  27. Even if what she says is right, Halle absolutely gets more opportunity than the average “black” actress. If you look at the billing she gets, I bet she has had more top billed roles over the last five years than all other “black” actresses combined.

    Her Oscar has little credibility. Or are we to agree that Driving Mrs. Daisy was a better film than Do the Right Thing. Or that Stanley Kubrick was never best director? Or that Denzel wasn’t Best Actor ’til Training Day. Same with Al Pachino and Scent of a Woman. Let’s not forget Scorcese not getting any love until The Departed.

    I personally think that Halle turned in an extraordinarily nuanced performance in Monster’s Ball but, outside of that, Dorothy Dandrige, and MAYBE Jungle Fever, she has never impressed me on screen with much other than her looks. This makes much of her argument moot in my eyes.

    As an aside, pretty much every top flight actress these days (Naomi Watts, Nichole Kidman, and Charleze Theron immediately come to mind) have had pretty intense sex scenes on screen – it kind of comes with the territory. If you actually watch Monster’s Ball as a film (i.e. an artistic expression) you will see that the sensibilities of the sex scene were completely in line with the rest of the film: unflinching, methodical, and longer than most people would be comfortable with. Every one of the set piece scenes (the first execution, her spanking her kid, and her epiphany at the end to name a few) follows this pattern. I am all for people drawing their own conclusions, but most people I know who are critical of the film basically zoned out the rest of it and concentrated on the sex scene, which – if we can agree that sex on screen can be allowed – isn’t really a fair way to evaluate it.

  28. Chance

    That is so true Rashid Halle Berry does get more work as an actress than the average black actress. She also gets movie role that are written for white actresses. It is good that you are able to see this. She also works as an actress more frequently too than the average black actress.

    Good to hear from you Rashid!

  29. LaKair

    i don’t consider Halle as black but as mixed race woman. i don’t think she has enough ethnic blood in her to be considered black to me. so it bothers me when folk say that she is the 1st black woman to recieve an Ocar. We have yet to accomplish that. Now if Gabby union, Vivica Fox, or even Vanessa Williams (both vanessa’s) had won i would feel that we have accomplished that goal.

  30. Chance

    Lakair wrote: i don’t consider Halle as black but as mixed race woman. i don’t think she has enough ethnic blood in her to be considered black to me. so it bothers me when folk say that she is the 1st black woman to recieve an Oscar. We have yet to accomplish that. Now if Gabby union, Vivica Fox, or even Vanessa Williams (both vanessa’s) had won i would feel that we have accomplished that goal.

    My response: I see your point Lakair, it has a lot to do with Vanessa Williams, Gabrielle union, and Vivica Fox being black identified females meaning they mainly consider themselves black. Wherefore, Halle Berry is bi racial and Halle is black identified too, but she acknowledges she is bi racial and mixed. The other three consider themselves mainly black, even though Vanessa Williams acknowledges she is mixed. So technically there really has never been a first black female to win an Oscar. Halle Berry is a mixed race woman she basically is the first bi racial woman with visible black ancestry to win an Oscar.

  31. I thought Vanessa Williams was biracial.

  32. Chance

    Rashid, both of Vanessa Williams parents self identify as black. Nut yeah she inherited all of those mixed race genes, and it is understandable why she would be thought of as bi racial she does look it. And, she looks it more than some people who are bi racial. Vanessa is what we call an MGM (multi generational mix or multi generational mulatto).

  33. tamika

    The reason why they consider Halleberry black is because she isn’t light enough to be considered white but she is dark enough to be considered black though she is of mixed race.lol

  34. Chance

    [quote post=”371″] Tamika wrote: The reason why they consider Halleberry black is because she isn’t light enough to be considered white but she is dark enough to be considered black though she is of mixed race.lol [/quote]

    My response:
    I agree that her skin tone plays a major role in her being considered black.

  35. Janise

    It’s so funny reading all of the above comments about Halle Berry and her Academy Award. Black, white, mullato, English, American – call her what you like, she is ALL of those things – I’d like to congratulate her, the actress, and not her racial makeup, for winning such a presigious accolade.

    Jeez! I think y’all are so hung up on race and skin colour, you lose sight of the HUMANITY of the person concerned …

  36. Chance

    Correct and this is why many people should leave other people alone and stop trying to force them to identify themselves as a member of some racial group. People should be allowed to self identity ethnicity wise as they please. Many people are so stuck up on race, and trying to force other people to be apart of their group.

  37. Janise

    @ Chance

    Why don’t you admit it – you crave to accepted as a member of the white race, but your skin colour just won’t allow it. Revel in your black skin, it’s a badge of pride and honour, Chance, not shame.

  38. Typical

    ummm, Janise? Chance’s skin is NOT black — not by any stretch of the imagination; and fyi… he’s ALREADY part white. He’s mixed.

    Why don’t YOU, Janise, stop trying to force mixed-race people into identifying as black only? What is your problem? Self-hatred maybe…?

  39. Chance

    Typical Wrote:
    Monday, February 4, 2008 at 12:51 pm –
    ummm, Janise? Chance’s skin is NOT black — not by any stretch of the imagination; and fyi… he’s ALREADY part white. He’s mixed.

    Why don’t YOU, Janise, stop trying to force mixed-race people into identifying as black only? What is your problem? Self-hatred maybe…?

    My response: I agree why can’t people just let people Identify how they please, and stop trying to force people into a monoracial category. Let people self Identify how they please. I am mixed race and I accept all my bloodlines that I am mixed with.

  40. Janise

    Darling, I don’t hate myself. I choose to identify myself as black but I have mixed ancestry, too. Just like lots of other people. Big deal.

    I just feel sorry for you guys. I sense a lot of confusion about your identity, and that underlying all the talk of wanting to believe you belong to a separate racial group called ‘mixed race’, what you really crave is to be accepted by, and to belong to, the white race. That is very, very sad. They will never accept you. And neither will I.

  41. Chance

    Janise Wrote:
    Tuesday, February 5, 2008 at 6:06 am –
    Darling, I don’t hate myself. I choose to identify myself as black but I have mixed ancestry, too. Just like lots of other people. Big deal.

    I just feel sorry for you guys. I sense a lot of confusion about your identity, and that underlying all the talk of wanting to believe you belong to a separate racial group called ‘mixed race’, what you really crave is to be accepted by, and to belong to, the white race. That is very, very sad. They will never accept you. And neither will I.

    My response: It is good that you won’t claim or accept certain people that means they are free. Now go and influence many others to follow your advice and let people self Identify as they please.

  42. Joseph

    Janise I do not accept you as a black woman. I dunno why, even though you are, I just think you should not be black. That’s how you sound to me when I see what you are writing.

    “They will never accept you.”

    The goal is not to be integrated into the white or black community.

    “And neither will I.”

    Good I do not want you to, but you seem to be pushing for us to accept being black like you.

  43. Cee Cee

    @ Chance

    Halle Berry has european features? What are you talking about? Yes we all know that Halle is both black and white, but all balck people do not have the same features. Nor do they have the same hair texture. East africans dont look like west africans, north africans don’t have the same features as south africans. So the only features on Halle that identify her with black is her skin tone? You sound soooo ridiculous.

  44. Like many monoracials we are not trying to ‘force’ you into choosing. We are stating some facts that you need to hear. As one sister from Ghana says ‘When the whites don’t want them we have to carry them’. its funny her daughter said that Halle Berry was two faced on this issue and said ‘I have no time for mixed race people… they think they are special’. I thought they were a hardliner for saying that at the time (1994) though I agreed with the latter statement. Over time I see where they are now coming from. If you do not wish to identify yourself as black then why do you expect representation from black organisations, films, award shows etc? Lisa Bonet saying she didn’t see herself as a black women yet is quick to want representation from a black family show. Why won’t you build your own facilities that represent your ‘race?’ You tend to dictate to blacks how you want it done. If you are dictating to black hairdressers that you want consideration for your ‘mixed textured’ hair why are you not applying that same message to white hairdressers? Get them also to do your hair stop relying on black people. I am not having whites off the hook they have to provide for you too. You are quick to critisise falsely accuse blacks as being the ‘problem’ you never have the same clout for whites though do you? You need to get off that high horse that you are this ‘superior race’ that should be considered more than other other people of colour. And thats what you are when it comes down to it – People of colour. but I suppose it doesn’t have the same superficial ring to it and it would mean you would have to challenge this system. What makes you think you don’t have to work as hard as other people of colour? Get on with it.




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