Pretty Yellow and Dark skin

 

 Pretty Yellow and Dark Skin

 

 By Chance Kelsey, Chancllorfiles.com

 

The tensions between pretty yellow and dark skin continue to be a problem among blacks. Many dark skin blacks feel that light skin blacks (pretty yellow) have more advantages in America than dark skin blacks. How do we deal with this? As stated skin color is still a problem among black Americans, and it plays out in politics and jobs too. For example, in the political race when Sharon Pratt Dixon ran for mayor of Washington D.C. – some blacks questioned whether or she really understood the issues that affected blacks in Washington D.C., and this was because Sharon was very light skin. Sharon’s skin tone is very white in color. 

 

 Senator Barack Obama is bi racial, his mother was white and his father was a black man from Kenya. Some blacks questioned whether or not Obama was black enough to be considered worthy of the black vote while he (Obama) companied as a presidential candidate. Barack Obama has caramel brown skin, and many black Americans have this Carmel brown skin color. This shows and proves that your mannerisms, culture, upbringing, environment, and ideas play a role in whether or not you are seen as being black culturally or white culturally.

Obama is seen as white culturally because when he lived in Kansas he lived I n a white neighborhood with his white grandparents. Obama also, lived in Indonesian for awhile as a little boy and attended school there. So this makes him culturally white American and internationally cultured. Barack Obama acknowledges that he is also black, and he accepts the fact that he is biracial.

 

When Vanessa Williams was crowned the first black Miss America – some blacks criticized the pageant because the judges elected a woman who was light skin and not black enough. Vanessa William has blue eyes and a Caramel beige skin color. There have been many situations of where the light skin versus dark skin phenomenon has played out I the work place, universities (promotion and hiring and other situations), politics, employment, hip hop music videos, and in the entertainment industry. Many blacks have complained about seeing colorism among blacks manifest to the point of arguments, criticism, favoritism, and fights.

When Washington DC mayor Mayor Marion Barry was under political pressure for drug taking, he tried to get his fair-complexioned wife to have her skin darkened in order to stabilize his waning Black support.

 Blacks will never be at peace as long as the one drop rule (ODR) still misclassifies anyone in America who has black blood (visible black ancestry in your phenotype (physical appearance)) as black. One of the ways to stop this unhappiness about skin color among blacks is to establish a mixed race category. Therefore, when Vanessa Williams, Barack Obama, and other like them wil be classified mixed, and they will be referred to as mixed race instead of just black.

 This will unset many dark skin blacks and even some caramel brown skin blacks (unless the dark skin and caramel brown skin blacks are blacks are bi racial) because they may complain about pretty yellow (light skin blacks) — but at the same time they don’t want them to be labeled mixed race either. Blacks understand the advantages they have by having light skin blacks among them.

They don’t want to loose those advantages but they are forced into second place by constantly having light skin blacks among them. Often it is dark skin blacks and certain caramel skin blacks who are in positions to favor light skin blacks over other blacks. Light skin blacks (yellow skin, reddish skin, beige, white looking skin) numerically are small in numbers among blacks.

Carmel dark skin blacks are the majority, then dark skin blacks, and last light skin blacks. You have to accept second place status or help establish a government category called mixed race, and you will chose the less painful of the two. There is no doubt that blacks still prefer to have light blacks (LSB) among them, and view this as less painful than having light skin blacks and biracials labeled mixed race. This is advantageous for blacks but too some degree painful for biracials and light skin blacks — because their identity gets sucked up into blackness, when they are not just black in phenotype (physical appearance).

Colorism will gradually disappear among blacks when America creates a category called mixed race. You can be mixed race and still be on friendly terms with blacks, whites, Asian, Latinos, and what ever racial groups you are mixed with. Dark skin blacks have to learn to like themselves more and stop letting the media influence their opinions about themselves.

 

Urban League Lawsuit Points Out Touchy Racial Issue: Light vs. Dark Posted by Marjory Raymer | The Flint Journal December 19, 2007 15:42PM

Categories: Breaking News,

 

Flint, Legal FLINT — Now, the issue isn’t just black and white. It’s, but everything in between, too. A lawsuit filed this month against the Urban League of Flint points to the increasingly complex issue of race and equality. A biracial employee, Jamie Kendall, sued the Urban League after not being promoted to CEO.

 She claims that she was asked if she was “black enough” to lead the organization dedicated to creating equal opportunities for African Americans and other minorities. “It is a touchy situation. We need to have some honest dialogue about it within our own culture,” said local NAACP President Frances Gilcreast. Glen Lenhoff, Kendall’s attorney, is one of the area’s leading attorneys on discrimination in the workforce, including reverse discrimination.

He acknowledges, though, that this case is a first for him. “I think it is an unusual case, but I think you’ll see more and more of these cases as time go on,” Lenhoff said. And, he still maintains it is simply discrimination based on skin color — just that this time it’s about the shade of the color because Kendall is light skinned.

The Urban League’s CEO, Lorna Latham, referred all calls to board president Valaria Conerly Moon, who could not be reached for comment. “I’ve always been a proponent that we need to clean our house and make sure our house is strong. We need to do what’s right for ourselves,” Gilcreast said. “Light brown, green, purple, whatever, you should have the same opportunities.”

The debate is sure to grow: The number of multiracial residents in Genesee County has steadily increased since 2000, the only racial category to do so, Census data shows. The issue has gone mainstream in recent years with the likes of Tiger Woods, whose ancestry is black, Caucasian, American Indian and Asian, and presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, whose mother was a Caucasian from Kansas and father a black from Kenya. And in Detroit, a club promotion allowing all-night free admission to black women with fair or light skin set off widespread complaints and opened old deep wounds in the black community. The event planned in October was canceled, and the promoter, who is black, apologized.

 “There is an irony because the Urban League is supposed to be the bastion of civil rights,” Lenhoff said. The lawsuit asks for damages in excess of $75,000. It claims Conerly Moon asked Kendall if she was bi-racial and then asked if she was “black enough” and if she could identify with black people. Kendall, manager of finance-operations, was one of three finalists for the CEO post but did not get the job.

She continues to work for the agency. Kendall also suing is for slander, claiming that Conerly Moon told at least one individual that Kendall was having an affair with the previous CEO. The Urban League has not yet responded to the lawsuit. The deadline is Dec. 26, although extensions are often given.

 


  1. Chancellor Fan

    My Dear Chancellor:

    You have hit the proverbial nail on the head. A “mixed race” category would absolutely alleviate (or even eliminate) the undeniable animosity that exists between the Light-Skinned and dark blacks.

    Please keep up the good work. Your writing is quite interesting!

  2. Chance

    Hey Fan,

    I sure will try and keep up the good work FAN. I talk about issues that need to be mentioned for others to hear and discuss.

    I will keep it up ad much as I can.

  3. Joseph

    I’m not sure about a mixed race category. There can be many variations with mixed race. Not all mixed race are black and white. Could be white and indian, indian and black, black and asian, asian and white, asian and indian, native american and indian, n. american and asian, et cetera. Maybe mixed race can be simply like whites and blacks with various groups among them, but mulattoes do not usually look similar to other mixed races. That’s why mulattoes in america are are identified with mulatoes of spanish descent and asked frequently, “are you Spanish”. 🙂

  4. Chance

    @ Joseph,

    That is true Joseph, and that is why a mixed race category should be allowed — so that even people who are not mixed with black and white — but are mixed with white and Asian, or mixed with whatever can also identify as mixed race.

  5. AP

    .

    Agreed.

    The entire “rift” noted would not exist if the
    average person in our society could begin
    to understand that, in actuality, there
    absolutely is no such thing whatsoever
    as a ‘Light-Skinned Black’ (LSB).

    The so-called ‘Light-Skinned Black’
    (which is an oxymoronic term, if ever
    one has existed) is actually Mixed-Race
    person who is of a ‘Multi-Generational
    Multiracially-Mixed’ (MGM-Mixed) Lineage.

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MGM-Mixed
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FGM-Mixed

    If society could both understand the concept
    of and accept and embrace the multi-millennia
    existence of MGM-Mixed people (rather
    than apply the racist one-drop rule to
    them and falsely label them as being
    Black), the “rift” noted would not exist.

    If every variety of Multi-racial person
    (including people who are MGM-Mixed)
    were categorized as being Multi-racial
    (and from there sub-categories could be
    made) and Mono-racial people were also
    placed in their applicable categories,
    the entire “rift” (which has, on many,
    many, many occasions been the result of
    unprovoked envy and jealousy-based hostility
    made by certain mono-racials against various
    multi-racials) may possibly cease to exist.

    Thus, not only is a Mixed-Race category
    very important and very much needed –
    but it is also equally important that
    it is understood that people of MGM-Mixed
    Lineage absolutely must be included in it.

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/3331.

    .

  6. Chance


    @ ALL People,

    You are so right MGM must be included in the mixed race category with bi racial (FGM). Often in many cases many biracials look like MGM and are considered black because they show visible black ancestry. Light skin blacks (LSB) is a code name for mixed race people. LSB was added (created) when mixed race (mulattoes) where forced to live with blacks.
    Thanks for the links, and good to here from you again.

  7. Keita Fennick

    Why do you say pretty light skin and dark skin.

    You don’t describe dark skin but you describe light skin as pretty. That’s like saying light skin is pretty & attractive and dark is normal or not attractive.

    I catch on to this. You seem to show bias yourself. You may have some psychological issue sagainst and psyhc issues against dark skinned blacks. You seem to be pro light skinned only. What kind of followers are you trying to get.

    I know many light skinned and dark skinend females who like dark skinned men and don’t like light skinned.

  8. Jen

    To: Keita Fennick

    He probably says “pretty light skin” because light skin is pretty; AND he probably says it because he has the right to say whatever he pleases. Should he be afraid to say that light skin is pretty? Is it okay to say that black is beautiful?

  9. Keita Fennick

    Black is beautiful, but when you just say “pretty light skin” your standing out saying your better than the rest of the black complexions.

    Not all light skin women are attractive. I have met a good number of unattractive light skinned women. You all are trying to start some sort of light skin supremacy foolishness. But unfortunately for you, you all are seen as nothing but another group N—–s, you just don’t know.

    Somebody has been wispering in your ears saying to you that light skin is better.

  10. AP

    Actually — it seems to me that the title
    of the thread did not imply, in anyway
    at all, that the poster felt that ONLY light
    skin was ‘pretty’ (and / or that light skin
    was ‘pretty’ at the exclusion of dark skin).

    This reaction being shown to the title,
    does make me wonder, however, why it is
    that so very often it is that so very
    many people of a darker-complexion
    (particularly the women) so very easily
    seem to take such great offense whenever
    they perceive that someone has not gone
    out of their way to either compliment
    dark-skin ‘specifically’ or to otherwise
    work to comfort their internal insecurities.

    If I had a dime for every single time
    — that I have either encountered or
    witnessed a dark-complexioned person
    (especially many of the women) simply
    make a false assumption about and/or
    a false accusation against someone
    else, based only on their clearly
    operatively-conditioned response
    of perceiving a baseless offense
    triggered by some obviously ‘imaginary
    slight’– I’d be a multi-millionaire.

    Again, it did not seem to me that the
    poster of the thread was, in anyway,
    using the title of the thread to state
    or even imply that they felt that ONLY
    light skin was ‘pretty’ (or that light
    skin was ‘pretty’ to the exclusion of
    dark skin being ‘pretty’) — so I think
    it is rather offensive to, without any
    proof, simply make the assumption that
    the poster was attempting to state or
    in anyway even imply any such thing.

    Personally, as a light-complexioned person
    I have both observed and encountered people
    react to the attacks and open favoritism
    against light skin –– with encouragement
    and / or with indifference – and it
    generally seems that this behavior is
    never condemned and rarely addressed.

    The reaction people have shown to the open
    attacks on the feature of light skin shows
    that there is ‘clearly a double-standard’ in
    which it appears some in society feel they
    have cart blanche to demand that everyone
    praise the feature of dark-skin (or else find
    themselves being falsely accused of ‘colorism’)
    while simultaneously openly disdaining the
    feature of light skin (with open reward).

    Let’s not forget that ‘colorism’ is a two-way
    street and utilizing a double-standard to
    use against light skinned people is simply
    an unacceptable mode of behavior.

  11. Vanessa (LS)

    In response to Keita Fennick’s comment, please note that I — and many of my girlfriends — prefer light-skinned men. I do not find dark skin men all that attractive.

    I have been in the presence of dark skinned women who say in front of me, that they are not attracted to light-skinned men (then they look at me!), and they say this in a derogatory way as though there is something wrong with having light skin. I suspect that they are very much attracted to light skinned men, but those pretty yellow men are not attracted to them!

    Perhaps, Keita Fennick, when you hear complimentary comments regarding “pretty yellow skin”, your anger stems from some self-hatred on your part?

    In any event, please note that I think that “pretty yellow” skin is absolutely gorgeous! And I am proud of the skin I’m in.

    You, Keita Fennick, think that black is beautiful. Well guess what? I think that Pretty Yellow is beautiful. So deal with it.

    ALSO, to Comment #10 (“AP”):
    You are absolutely 100% CORRECT! There is a double standard: Why is it ok for dark skin blacks to say “black is beautiful” but it is NOT OK for pretty yellow people to say “Light Skin is beautiful”?

  12. AT Keita Fennick, AP, and Jen

    I agree with AP, I did not write this to make fun of dark skin blacks. Pretty yellow is a is metaphor for mixed race looking people. Black people say black is beautiful, well yellow is pretty. It does not mean that pretty yellow is better than beautiful dark skin. How often do you see mixed race people (mulattoes) getting angry at dark skin blacks for saying black beautiful? That’s right you don’t see it on average but dark skin blacks get angry if some one say that they have pretty yellow skin. This is a double standard all the way. It makes you wonder if some of these blacks really dislike being black.

    Pretty yellow can be the equivalent of black is beautiful. When blacks write black is beautiful how many people who are yellow skin or lighter get upset and attack blacks? They let blacks claim black is beautiful and it is beautiful. Pretty yellow is a metaphor for mulattoes (mixed race looking people) and if one wants to it can be used as the equivalent of black is beautiful.

    But pretty yellow is the term used to describe mixed race people or a person who is visible mixed race.
    AP thank you for helping clarify this.

    @ Keita,

    Not all light skin women and men are good looking but I will bet the majority are meaning out of a 100% 70% or more (are good looking). I am not trying to start some light skin supremacy foolishness, many blacks, whites, Asians, Latinos, and other racial groups in America and around the world have this stuff going on already. Certain mulattoes who show visible black ancestry are only seen as black because currently in America, for blacks, whites, and mulattoes (mixed race) there is only a two racial category system, and that is you are either labeled black or white.

    This is why we need to bring back a third category called mixed race or some name that would allow us mixed race people to recognized as such.

  13. Keita Fennick

    I have nothing with anybody saying pretty light skin but it just seems on this forum that being light complexion or mixed race is a major issue. Racism should be the issue not complexion. I thought this stuff went away during the black power struggle, and definately the 80s. But there are some still some sick people out there.

    It’s not dark skin, dark brown, medium brown, or brown but light skin. It has always been the light skin ones that have complex issues. During slavery times and post, light skinned slaves thought they were better than the other slaves. But as I said before and I’ll say it again, you’re seen no different than the other complexioned blacks. So why bother with this mixed category thing that white people made up?

    To Vannessa, you say you prefer light skinned men. You probably like white dudes with your brainwashed self. You’re not attracted to dark skinned men? Well, what caused this not being attracted to dark skin? Where did you learn it from? Did you people know that Jesus was dark skinned? You people can’t possibly be pro black.

    You’re racist against black people yourself. You’re racist against a certain segment of black people, if you listen to your own words. You are no different that whites who see a black face and instantly discriminates. Your the type who would want your baby to come out light with curly hair. It would not be because you love your mate but so that you could have that kind of baby.

    I have always heard that light skinned blacks or mulattos have had some complex issues and identity crisis issues. But from some of the things I am reading….UH OH. I did n’t want to believe it but now it’s clear as day.

    I am dark brown skin male and I like all black women from dark to light. I don’t have these psyche issues like many of you do. I can recognize beauty in all complexions of black women.

    Good looking dark skinned women are Kerry Washington, Phylicia Rashad, and Gabrielle Union. Pretty light skinned women are Lisa Ray, Lela rachon, and Deelicious(Flavor of Love Show) I am not biased.

  14. Denise

    Edited

    I have to admit that darker skinned blacks feel and have always felt deeper pain and have deeper wounds from slavery than lighter skin blacks.

    Many of the offspring of white slave masters had better privileges and formed elite societies which still exists today.
    The majority of the black elites are categorized as light skinned blacks. Many of the lighter skinned families forbid darker skinned individuals from entering the family, down south we call it keeping the color in the family.
    Even in my own family relatives were once forbidden to date darker skin blacks.

    Lighter skinned black families on average are likely to be more educated and wealthy.

    Lighter skinned black people are also considered more attractive to most black people. All of the issues that I stated about above, are the reason why there is so much tension among darker skinned blacks and lighter skinned blacks. I live in Georgia-the deep south and I am telling you that down here in 2008, “redbones” are considered the cream of the crop to most southern black men; if you are a caramel colored black you have to have “good hair” and beautiful features, and if you are dark skinned in the south you have to have an hourglass shape with a huge butt; this is sad but most black men-not all feel this way in America-especially down south.

    Let’s put and end to colorism, not through separation, but unity deriving from the Bible and an education.

  15. “Pretty Yellow”

    Our deepest fear is that we are inadequate.
    Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure.
    It is our Light, not our darkness, that most frightens us.
    We ask ourselves, who am I to be brilliant,
    gorgeous, talented, fabulous?
    Actually, who are you NOT to be?
    You are a child of God.

    Your playing small does not serve the world.
    There is nothing enlightening about shrinking
    so that other people won’t feel unsure around you.

    We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us.
    It is not just in some of us; it is in everyone.

    As we let our own Light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same.
    As we are liberated from our own fear,
    our presence automatically liberates others.

    I believe that a better future is in the hands of mixed people. If we are the future and eventual outcome of the human race, then I say the future is looking real good! ;D

    Keep dimming the lines people… we’re doing great!

  16. “Pretty Yellow”

    Our deepest fear is that we are inadequate.
    Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure.
    It is our Light, not our darkness, that most frightens us.
    We ask ourselves, who am I to be brilliant,
    gorgeous, talented, fabulous?
    Actually, who are you NOT to be?
    You are a child of God.

    Your playing small does not serve the world.
    There is nothing enlightening about shrinking
    so that other people won’t feel unsure around you.

    We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us.
    It is not just in some of us; it is in everyone.

    As we let our own Light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same.
    As we are liberated from our own fear,
    our presence automatically liberates others.

    I believe that a better future is in the hands of mixed people. If we are the future and eventual outcome of the human race, then I say the future is looking real good! ;D

    Keep dimming the lines people… we’re doing great!

  17. Lena

    Are you tired of defining your race instead of your curls?

    http://www.MixedChicks.net/dutchhome.html

    http://www.MixedChicks.net

  18. AP

    Keita Fennick wrote:

    “…it just seems on this forum
    that being light complexion or
    mixed race is a major issue.”

    AP’s response:

    Gee — for some very odd reason it
    actually seemed that the founder,
    owner and moderator of this very
    group was a person who was both
    of a Mixed-Race lineage and who
    had created this very forum
    — where any variety of topics
    (including, or perhaps, especially
    even those about the many varied
    experiences of mixed-race people)
    could quite openly be discussed.

    Now why would anyone ever
    have thought any such thing?

    Oh wait – perhaps it’s because
    of comments such as can be
    found in the following link.

    http://chancellorfiles.com/blog1/about/

    Keita Fennick wrote:

    ”During slavery times and post,
    light skinned slaves thought they
    were better than the other slaves.”

    AP’s response:

    Boy oh boy – I was wondering when
    this “grasping-for-straws, last-resort
    statement-of-the-truly-desperate”
    would eventually rear it false,
    ugly and mythical head.

    It is truly my hope, that at some point in
    your life, you come to realize that the
    comment and false accusation that you
    have made (along with the widely-held,
    and yet totally erroneous belief on which
    it is clearly based) about light-skinned
    slaves having allegedly ”thought they
    were better” than the other slaves ” —
    is nothing more than an false ”urban myth”
    (which ranks right alongside the infamous
    ’Willie Lynch Letter’ myth) and is it so often
    the rabbit-pulled-out-of-the-hat when some
    people see their false ‘colorism’ accusation
    — against light-skinned people — has failed
    — that it has become something of a cliché.

    In reality, the true facts about the life
    of the chattel slaves (both mixed-race
    ones and full-black ones) during the
    antebellum period are as follows:

    The overwhelming vast majority of the
    mixed-race slaves were (just like the
    full-black slaves) forced to work in the
    fields; whipped, raped, beaten, bred,
    and also sold away from their families.

    In other words, they went thru every
    single horror that the full-black slaves
    encountered and — despite the ‘myth
    of preferential treatment’ (that was both
    falsely spread and perceived by a large
    number of full-black slaves who were
    often very envious and jealous of the
    mixed-race slaves, due to their having
    features which so often reminded the
    full-black slaves of the mixed-race
    slave’s White or Amerindian lineage)
    — generally never saw themselves as
    being ”better” than the full-Black slaves
    (although anyone could see that the two
    groups were “different” than each other).

    Often the full-black slaves simply (and
    clearly wrongfully) assumed that the
    mixed-race slaves (some of whom had
    nearly completely white features) would
    be given a better treatment because of
    some mythical chance that the white
    people would feel some level or type
    of kinship with the mixed-race slaves.

    History and fully-researched statistics
    show that absolutely nothing could be
    any further from the truth on this.

    This myth of preferential treatment of the
    mixed-race slaves (and any “arrogance”
    they would have developed, as a result)
    carries with it other false concepts
    … such as the following:

    — the vast majority of the slaves
    on the plantations were full-black;
    — only the full-blacks did the real
    back-breaking work on the plantations;
    — the mixed-race slaves were all
    conceived via some plantation owner
    having kept a slave ”mistress”
    — the mixed-race slaves were the
    offspring of the plantation owners; and
    — the mixed-race slaves received
    better treatment from White people

    The truth is that, the only place most of
    the mixed-race slaves were ever shown
    anything that even resembled preferential
    treatment was usually when it was done
    by certain ones of the full-black slaves
    (particularly those who were enthralled
    by the mixed-race slaves’ features).

    Many of the full-black slaves would witness
    this preferential treatment — being shown
    to the mixed-race slaves (by their very own
    full-black brethren, no less) — and not only
    would they become envious-hearted and
    jealous at seeing this but they would then
    also make the false assumption that the
    mixed-race slaves were treated even
    better than that by the White people
    (while, in reality, most of the White people
    hated and feared the mixed-race slaves
    more than they did the full-black slaves)

    Another myth that needs to be dispelled is
    that the majority of the mixed-race slaves
    worked in ‘the big house’ while most of
    the full-black slaves toiled in the fields.

    Again – the overwhelming vast majority of
    the mixed-race slaves had the exact same
    jobs as the full-black slaves; were not few
    in number; and were not given preference
    when it came to working in “the big house”.

    The majority of the plantations actually
    had more mixed-race slaves than they
    did full-black slaves (as it was found
    that it was cheaper to “breed” slaves
    via forcible-rape/sexual assault than it
    was to import them across the ocean).

    In fact, the census records taken during the
    antebellum period shows that, in a mere
    ten (10) year period, while the full-black
    slave population grew by 20% — the
    nearly three (3) times that amount.

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1602

    On the average plantation (most of which
    were the size of a small farm – and looked
    nothing like the infamous ‘Tara’ of ‘Gone
    with the Wind’ fame), it was not any more
    advantageous to be a mixed-race slave than
    it was to be a full-black slave, and, in fact,
    the full-black slaves were actually seen by
    the White people to be of a lot more value
    than were the mixed-race ones – as the
    White people often felt that the full-black
    slaves were much stronger, harder working
    and much more loyal to White people than
    they generally did the mixed-race slaves.

    Contrary to popular myth, most of
    the mixed-race slaves were not the
    offspring of the ‘owners’ and ‘sons of
    owners’ of the plantations, but rather,
    were actually largely the offspring of
    the ‘overseers’ of the plantations —
    who the owners regularly encouraged
    to rape the enslaved women (no matter
    if the women were full-black or were
    mixed-race) both as way of subduing
    them and also as a cheap way to
    “breed” more enslaved people.

    In the overwhelming vast majority of the
    cases, not only did these mixed-race
    offspring most definitely *not* receive
    any type of better treatment than did
    the full-black slaves — most of the time
    their treatment was actually far worse
    (particularly since most plantation owners
    wives and daughters were taught to see
    these mixed-race slaves as being just the
    offspring of drunken, low-class overseers
    and did not even generally want them inside
    the plantation household — which is why so
    many of the ‘mammies’, ‘fiddlers’, ‘drivers’,
    ‘seamstresses’, ‘cooks’ and the like —
    were full-black, rather than mixed-race)

    Keita Fennick wrote:


    “But as I said before and I’ll say it
    again, you’re seen no different
    than the other complexioned blacks.
    So why bother with this
    mixed category thing …”

    AP’s response:

    Well — for those of us who have, as it
    were, decided to ‘leave the plantation’
    (and it’s false and racist teachings)-–
    we really have no care or interest,
    whatsoever, in whether or not we,
    as a result of our racial lineage,
    are “seen as any different” –no
    matter who is doing the “looking”.

    Part one’s “freedom” is that they
    do not feel that they need anyone’s
    ‘approval’ or ‘permission’ in order
    to openly acknowledge who they are.

    No matter how others, in their ignorance,
    choose to ”see” us, we will not live our
    lives according to a racist ‘one drop rule’
    that was created by slave masters –- in
    order to deny us our right to embrace
    and acknowledge our full lineage; in
    order to force us into a category into
    which we do not belong; and in order
    to pretend that there was something
    “tainted” about the Black or other
    non-White portion of our lineage.

    Keita Fennick wrote:

    “To Vannessa, you say
    you prefer light skinned men.
    You probably like white dudes
    with your brainwashed self.”

    AP’s response:

    You say this like it’s a “bad thing” .

    For crying out loud — “brainwashed”?

    Oh, give me a break for heavens sake.

    Your statements as well as your attitudes
    come across as so very racist – and yet
    because of this odd double-standard
    that you seem to practice so well, you
    do not even appear to realize this.

    Not only do you imply that it’s ‘not OK’
    for a mixed-race (or for any person) to
    find themselves attracted to people who
    happen to look a great deal like them
    (i.e. other mixed-race people) – but now
    you also seem to say you have a problem
    with them being attracted to anyone who
    is lighter than then are — yet, at the
    very same time, you almost seem to demand
    that they find themselves attracted
    to someone who is darker than they are
    (and if they do not have this preference
    that you demand, they should expect
    to hear the false accusation
    of ‘colorism’ tossed at them).

    Again, by behaving in such a matter,
    you are revealing that your hypocritical
    application of a clear ‘double-standard’
    —- when it comes condemning another
    person’s choices and preferences– unless,
    of course, the preference or choice that is
    being made is for someone with dark-skin.

    Maybe the information contained in the
    following links would be of help to you.

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1400

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/2241

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/3331

    Keita Fennick wrote:

    ”Your the type who would want your
    baby to come out light with curly hair.”

    AP’s response:

    And as a person who was born and still
    remains “light with curly hair” – I cannot
    help but to be curious as to why you
    state these features as if they
    are somehow ‘a bad thing’.

    You do not seem to display that same
    type of condemning tone toward the
    people who want their children
    born “dark with kinky hair”.

    Hmmmm … can anyone
    here say ‘double-standard’?

    Keita Fennick wrote:


    ”I have always heard that light
    skinned blacks or mulattos have
    had some complex issues and
    identity crisis issues.”

    AP’s response:

    Wow – it seems your every perception
    of us is based strictly on either ‘your
    personal experience’ (which, like that of
    most people, is likely very small) and / or
    what you “have always heard” about us.

    Now how would you like it if YOU were
    treated in that type of manner or with
    that type of disrespect — by someone
    who, rather than truly trying to get to
    know you as a person or understand your
    view points or experiences in life – simply
    based all of their perceptions of you on
    “urban myths”; things they “have always
    heard” and their limited life experiences.?

    That shoe probably wouldn’t feel too good
    on either one of your feet — needless to say.

    Come on now people … can’t we all just
    get along — while allowing each other to
    be exactly who and what we are and also be
    able to acknowledge, celebrate and embrace
    both our differences and similarities?

  19. AP

    Keita Fennick wrote:

    “…it just seems on this forum
    that being light complexion or
    mixed race is a major issue.”

    AP’s response:

    Gee — for some very odd reason it
    actually seemed that the founder,
    owner and moderator of this very
    group was a person who was both
    of a Mixed-Race lineage and who
    had created this very forum
    — where any variety of topics
    (including, or perhaps, especially
    even those about the many varied
    experiences of mixed-race people)
    could quite openly be discussed.

    Now why would anyone ever
    have thought any such thing?

    Oh wait – perhaps it’s because
    of comments such as can be
    found in the following link.

    http://chancellorfiles.com/blog1/about/

    Keita Fennick wrote:

    ”During slavery times and post,
    light skinned slaves thought they
    were better than the other slaves.”

    AP’s response:

    Boy oh boy – I was wondering when
    this “grasping-for-straws, last-resort
    statement-of-the-truly-desperate”
    would eventually rear it false,
    ugly and mythical head.

    It is truly my hope, that at some point in
    your life, you come to realize that the
    comment and false accusation that you
    have made (along with the widely-held,
    and yet totally erroneous belief on which
    it is clearly based) about light-skinned
    slaves having allegedly ”thought they
    were better” than the other slaves ” —
    is nothing more than an false ”urban myth”
    (which ranks right alongside the infamous
    ’Willie Lynch Letter’ myth) and is it so often
    the rabbit-pulled-out-of-the-hat when some
    people see their false ‘colorism’ accusation
    — against light-skinned people — has failed
    — that it has become something of a cliché.

    In reality, the true facts about the life
    of the chattel slaves (both mixed-race
    ones and full-black ones) during the
    antebellum period are as follows:

    The overwhelming vast majority of the
    mixed-race slaves were (just like the
    full-black slaves) forced to work in the
    fields; whipped, raped, beaten, bred,
    and also sold away from their families.

    In other words, they went thru every
    single horror that the full-black slaves
    encountered and — despite the ‘myth
    of preferential treatment’ (that was both
    falsely spread and perceived by a large
    number of full-black slaves who were
    often very envious and jealous of the
    mixed-race slaves, due to their having
    features which so often reminded the
    full-black slaves of the mixed-race
    slave’s White or Amerindian lineage)
    — generally never saw themselves as
    being ”better” than the full-Black slaves
    (although anyone could see that the two
    groups were “different” than each other).

    Often the full-black slaves simply (and
    clearly wrongfully) assumed that the
    mixed-race slaves (some of whom had
    nearly completely white features) would
    be given a better treatment because of
    some mythical chance that the white
    people would feel some level or type
    of kinship with the mixed-race slaves.

    History and fully-researched statistics
    show that absolutely nothing could be
    any further from the truth on this.

    This myth of preferential treatment of the
    mixed-race slaves (and any “arrogance”
    they would have developed, as a result)
    carries with it other false concepts
    … such as the following:

    — the vast majority of the slaves
    on the plantations were full-black;
    — only the full-blacks did the real
    back-breaking work on the plantations;
    — the mixed-race slaves were all
    conceived via some plantation owner
    having kept a slave ”mistress”
    — the mixed-race slaves were the
    offspring of the plantation owners; and
    — the mixed-race slaves received
    better treatment from White people

    The truth is that, the only place most of
    the mixed-race slaves were ever shown
    anything that even resembled preferential
    treatment was usually when it was done
    by certain ones of the full-black slaves
    (particularly those who were enthralled
    by the mixed-race slaves’ features).

    Many of the full-black slaves would witness
    this preferential treatment — being shown
    to the mixed-race slaves (by their very own
    full-black brethren, no less) — and not only
    would they become envious-hearted and
    jealous at seeing this but they would then
    also make the false assumption that the
    mixed-race slaves were treated even
    better than that by the White people
    (while, in reality, most of the White people
    hated and feared the mixed-race slaves
    more than they did the full-black slaves)

    Another myth that needs to be dispelled is
    that the majority of the mixed-race slaves
    worked in ‘the big house’ while most of
    the full-black slaves toiled in the fields.

    Again – the overwhelming vast majority of
    the mixed-race slaves had the exact same
    jobs as the full-black slaves; were not few
    in number; and were not given preference
    when it came to working in “the big house”.

    The majority of the plantations actually
    had more mixed-race slaves than they
    did full-black slaves (as it was found
    that it was cheaper to “breed” slaves
    via forcible-rape/sexual assault than it
    was to import them across the ocean).

    In fact, the census records taken during
    the antebellum period shows that, in a
    mere ten (10) year period, while the
    full-black slave population grew by
    20% — the mixed-race slave population
    grew nearly three (3) times that amount.

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1602

    On the average plantation (most of which
    were the size of a small farm – and looked
    nothing like the infamous ‘Tara’ of ‘Gone
    with the Wind’ fame), it was not any more
    advantageous to be a mixed-race slave than
    it was to be a full-black slave, and, in fact,
    the full-black slaves were actually seen by
    the White people to be of a lot more value
    than were the mixed-race ones – as the
    White people often felt that the full-black
    slaves were much stronger, harder working
    and much more loyal to White people than
    they generally did the mixed-race slaves.

    Contrary to popular myth, most of
    the mixed-race slaves were not the
    offspring of the ‘owners’ and ‘sons of
    owners’ of the plantations, but rather,
    were actually largely the offspring of
    the ‘overseers’ of the plantations —
    who the owners regularly encouraged
    to rape the enslaved women (no matter
    if the women were full-black or were
    mixed-race) both as way of subduing
    them and also as a cheap way to
    “breed” more enslaved people.

    In the overwhelming vast majority of the
    cases, not only did these mixed-race
    offspring most definitely *not* receive
    any type of better treatment than did
    the full-black slaves — most of the time
    their treatment was actually far worse
    (particularly since most plantation owners
    wives and daughters were taught to see
    these mixed-race slaves as being just the
    offspring of drunken, low-class overseers
    and did not even generally want them inside
    the plantation household — which is why so
    many of the ‘mammies’, ‘fiddlers’, ‘drivers’,
    ‘seamstresses’, ‘cooks’ and the like —
    were full-black, rather than mixed-race)

    Keita Fennick wrote:


    “But as I said before and I’ll say it
    again, you’re seen no different
    than the other complexioned blacks.
    So why bother with this
    mixed category thing …”

    AP’s response:

    Well — for those of us who have, as it
    were, decided to ‘leave the plantation’
    (and it’s false and racist teachings)-–
    we really have no care or interest,
    whatsoever, in whether or not we,
    as a result of our racial lineage,
    are “seen as any different” –no
    matter who is doing the “looking”.

    Part one’s “freedom” is that they
    do not feel that they need anyone’s
    ‘approval’ or ‘permission’ in order
    to openly acknowledge who they are.

    No matter how others, in their ignorance,
    choose to ”see” us, we will not live our
    lives according to a racist ‘one drop rule’
    that was created by slave masters –- in
    order to deny us our right to embrace
    and acknowledge our full lineage; in
    order to force us into a category into
    which we do not belong; and in order
    to pretend that there was something
    “tainted” about the Black or other
    non-White portion of our lineage.

    Keita Fennick wrote:

    “To Vannessa, you say
    you prefer light skinned men.
    You probably like white dudes
    with your brainwashed self.”

    AP’s response:

    You say this like it’s a “bad thing” .

    For crying out loud — “brainwashed”?

    Oh, give me a break for heavens sake.

    Your statements as well as your attitudes
    come across as so very racist – and yet
    because of this odd double-standard
    that you seem to practice so well, you
    do not even appear to realize this.

    Not only do you imply that it’s ‘not OK’
    for a mixed-race (or for any person) to
    find themselves attracted to people who
    happen to look a great deal like them
    (i.e. other mixed-race people) – but now
    you also seem to say you have a problem
    with them being attracted to anyone who
    is lighter than then are — yet, at the
    very same time, you almost seem to demand
    that they find themselves attracted
    to someone who is darker than they are
    (and if they do not have this preference
    that you demand, they should expect
    to hear the false accusation
    of ‘colorism’ tossed at them).

    Again, by behaving in such a matter,
    you are revealing that your hypocritical
    application of a clear ‘double-standard’
    —- when it comes condemning another
    person’s choices and preferences– unless,
    of course, the preference or choice that is
    being made is for someone with dark-skin.

    Maybe the information contained in the
    following links would be of help to you.

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1400

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/2241

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/3331

    Keita Fennick wrote:

    ”Your the type who would want your
    baby to come out light with curly hair.”

    AP’s response:

    And as a person who was born and still
    remains “light with curly hair” – I cannot
    help but to be curious as to why you
    state these features as if they
    are somehow ‘a bad thing’.

    You do not seem to display that same
    type of condemning tone toward the
    people who want their children
    born “dark with kinky hair”.

    Hmmmm … can anyone
    here say ‘double-standard’?

    Keita Fennick wrote:


    ”I have always heard that light
    skinned blacks or mulattos have
    had some complex issues and
    identity crisis issues.”

    AP’s response:

    Wow – it seems your every perception
    of us is based strictly on either ‘your
    personal experience’ (which, like that of
    most people, is likely very small) and / or
    what you “have always heard” about us.

    Now how would you like it if YOU were
    treated in that type of manner or with
    that type of disrespect — by someone
    who, rather than truly trying to get to
    know you as a person or understand your
    view points or experiences in life – simply
    based all of their perceptions of you on
    “urban myths”; things they “have always
    heard” and their limited life experiences.?

    That shoe probably wouldn’t feel too good
    on either one of your feet — needless to say.

    Come on now people … can’t we all just
    get along — while allowing each other to
    be exactly who and what we are and also be
    able to acknowledge, celebrate and embrace
    both our differences and similarities?

  20. Chance


    @ Denise,

    You have spoken and made some good points Denise, and thank you for sharing your observations.
    Denise wrote: Let’s put and end to colorism, not through separation, but unity deriving from the Bible and an education.

    I will say — that it would be nice if we all could just follow the teachings of the bible and education — but the reality is, that many dark skin blacks will still be unhappy about there perceived second class status in the black race. Therefore, there will always be tensions between them and light skin blacks. For over one hundred years since the days of slavery and all through the 20th century many blacks have advocated we must get along with each other and generation after generation these two groups have never gotten along. The reason is because light skin blacks are not black enough in phenotype, and are really a mixed race group of people. Light skin black men often are considered not black enough meaning they show by way of habits, behavior, and attitudes that they are influenced by what ever other racial and ethnic groups they are mixed with especially mixed with white.

    The two do need to be separated by way of category. Thank you for sharing it was very insightful.

  21. Chance

    @ Keita Fennick And Other

    Keita Fennick Wrote: I have nothing with anybody saying pretty light skin but it just seems on this forum that being light complexion or mixed race is a major issue. Racism should be the issue not complexion. I thought this stuff went away during the black power struggle, and definately the 80s. But there are some still some sick people out there.
    My response: Racism is partially based upon skin complexion, and yes this forum does discuss issues that affect mixed race people, and other issues as well.

    Keita Fennick Wrote: It’s not dark skin, dark brown, medium brown, or brown but light skin. It has always been the light skin ones that have complex issues. During slavery times and post, light skinned slaves thought they were better than the other slaves. But as I said before and I’ll say it again, you’re seen no different than the other complexioned blacks. So why bother with this mixed category thing that white people made up?

    My response: Go tell certain dark skin blacks that mixed race looking people are no different from other complexioned blacks in America, and hopefully, they will listen to you and stop being rude and disrespectful towards light skin blacks (mixed people).
    Vanessa like all women have her preference for men just like you have your prefer keita. Many dark skin women prefer light skin men, and they have a right too. I agree that there are many women from all skin tones that are beautiful.

    Other thanks for the support, we mixed people are the future.

  22. Keita Fennick

    In the ancient times dark or black was praise by blacks and other nations. This phase that you all are going through is called white supremacy or Eurocentric standards.

    You learned this as early from the wombs. From when you were a little kid with Barbie dolls and TV. You all have been taught to hate dark but cherish light.

    You all suffer from that. Light skin people come from dark skin people. It’s a fact. No matter how much you try to be white you won’t. I’m sorry I have to break that to you.

    Not all dark skinned people are jealous of light skin, so please put your ego in check. There was a site called lightskinpeople.com. I don’t know if it’s still up but you should hook up with those people.

  23. AP


    Keita Fennick wrote:

    In the ancient times dark
    or black was praise…

    AP’s response:

    In my humble opinion, the only entity
    in the entire universe that should
    ever receive “praise” is God.

    In addition, please feel free to become aware
    of the fact that ‘a new day’ has dawned and
    we are not living ‘in the ancient times’ or
    in a pre-1967 United States of America —
    thus, those of us who are Mixed-Race (and
    who are not Mono-racial) are no longer
    forced to falsely claim to be ‘Black’,
    ‘White’ or any other sort of Mono-Racial.


    Keita Fennick wrote:

    This phase that you all are going
    through is called white supremacy
    or Eurocentric standards.

    AP’s response:

    Sorry to burst your bubble — but what
    you have so falsely and condescendingly
    and referred to as being “phase”, is
    actually both my ‘life’ and my ‘lineage’.

    What I am speaking about is not some passing
    fancy or faddish trend – but, rather, is ME,
    and I find your description of who and what
    I am to be disrespectful and rather insulting.

    In addition, clearly the only people
    who are “going through … white
    supremacy or Eurocentric standards”
    are those who choose to embrace,
    practice and force onto others the
    racist concept of the ‘One-Drop Rule’.

    The racist ‘One-Drop Rule’ was invented
    by White racial-supremacists to create the
    false belief that the Black bloodline in a
    Mixed-Race person’s lineage was “tainted”
    and therefore resultud in the annihilation
    of all of the non-Black blood in their
    body (which is why ‘One-Drop Rule’ was
    used to force Mixed-Race to be falsely
    categorized as being full-Black).

    If buying into that racist nonsense is not
    a clear example of “going through … white
    supremacy or Eurocentric standards” — then
    I cannot possible image what else would be.


    Keita Fennick wrote:

    “… You all have been taught
    to hate dark but cherish light.
    You all suffer from that…

    AP’s response:

    You certainly seem to have a knack for tossing
    assumption-based, false-accusations all around.

    A person taking the powerful step of deciding
    to refuse to deny or hold any part of their
    lineage in shame or secret is hardly what
    any logical observer would normally refer
    to as “suffering” – in fact, a logical person
    would more likely call it ’empowering’ oneself.


    Keita Fennick wrote:

    No matter how much you
    try to be white you won’t.
    I’m sorry I have to break that to you.

    AP’s response:

    Once agan — we are not trying — in any
    way “to be white” (or any other sort of
    mono-racial, including that of full-Black)

    Why do you not seem to get it that —
    Mixed-Race is also a “racial” category
    — and that ‘White’ is *not* the only
    alternative to a person being ‘Black’?

    For the ka-billionth time — those of
    us who are both Mixed-Race and who
    refuse to hold our full-lineage in shame
    or secret — will also not allow ourselves
    to be “passed” off as either ‘White’ or as
    ‘Black’ (or any other sort of Mono-Racial).

    We Mixed-Race people are our own people
    — we are a separate group from any type
    of mono-racial people — and — if you
    could sonehome simply manage see beyond
    yourself for more than one moment —
    you would understand that ‘we’ both do
    and have the right to exist as who ‘we’
    are — as much as you do who you are.


    Keita Fennick wrote:

    There was a site called lightskinpeople.com
    … you should hook up with those people.

    AP’s response:

    The public acknowledgment and embracing of
    one’s full lineage via having a ‘Mixed-Race
    Identity’ is NOT about skin-coloring or tone
    — as, petty nonsense like that may be the
    obsession of certain Mono-Racial people
    — but it is not ours (despite the false,
    perception-based and jealousy-inspired
    myths continually spread about us by
    those same certain Mono-Racial people).

    Mixed-Race individuals and groups come any
    of a wide variety of skin colorings, tones,
    hues; facial features; hair textures; and
    body shapes, sizes and types — that
    there is actually not a singular
    ‘one’ description of Mixed-Race.

    This even includes people who are Mulattoes —
    as Mulattoes come in any variety of features
    — ranging in looks from people scuh as …
    Frederick Douglass, Lenny Kravitz, Rachel
    True, Samantha Mumba, Mel B (of the Spice
    Girls fame)— Lena Horne, Jayne Kennedy
    Overton; Freda Payne, Vanessa Williams —
    to Lonette McKee, Jennifer Beals, Wentworth
    Miller, Vin Deisel — as well as literally
    everything and everyone who is in-between.

    Therefore, there would be no point in trying
    to send any of us to a ‘light-skinned’ web
    site (and thus, falsely implying that due
    to our embrace of our full-lineage, we, thus,
    would automatically have to be ‘Colorists’)
    —- as, once again, any of us can proudly
    tell you that we all know for a fact that
    “Mixed (not “Black”) Comes In All Colors”

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1400
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/2241
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/3331
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1602

  24. AP


    Keita Fennick wrote:

    In the ancient times dark
    or black was praise…

    AP’s response:

    In my humble opinion, the only entity
    in the entire universe that should
    ever receive “praise” is God.

    In addition, please feel free to become aware
    of the fact that ‘a new day’ has dawned and
    we are not living ‘in the ancient times’ or
    in a pre-1967 United States of America —
    thus, those of us who are Mixed-Race (and
    who are not Mono-racial) are no longer
    forced to falsely claim to be ‘Black’,
    ‘White’ or any other sort of Mono-Racial.


    Keita Fennick wrote:

    This phase that you all are going
    through is called white supremacy
    or Eurocentric standards.

    AP’s response:

    Sorry to burst your bubble — but what
    you have so falsely and condescendingly
    and referred to as being “phase”, is
    actually both my ‘life’ and my ‘lineage’.

    What I am speaking about is not some passing
    fancy or faddish trend – but, rather, is ME,
    and I find your description of who and what
    I am to be disrespectful and rather insulting.

    In addition, clearly the only people
    who are “going through … white
    supremacy or Eurocentric standards”
    are those who choose to embrace,
    practice and force onto others the
    racist concept of the ‘One-Drop Rule’.

    The racist ‘One-Drop Rule’ was invented
    by White racial-supremacists to create the
    false belief that the Black bloodline in a
    Mixed-Race person’s lineage was “tainted”
    and therefore resultud in the annihilation
    of all of the non-Black blood in their
    body (which is why ‘One-Drop Rule’ was
    used to force Mixed-Race to be falsely
    categorized as being full-Black).

    If buying into that racist nonsense is not
    a clear example of “going through … white
    supremacy or Eurocentric standards” — then
    I cannot possible image what else would be.


    Keita Fennick wrote:

    “… You all have been taught
    to hate dark but cherish light.
    You all suffer from that…

    AP’s response:

    You certainly seem to have a knack for tossing
    assumption-based, false-accusations all around.

    A person taking the powerful step of deciding
    to refuse to deny or hold any part of their
    lineage in shame or secret is hardly what
    any logical observer would normally refer
    to as “suffering” – in fact, a logical person
    would more likely call it ’empowering’ oneself.


    Keita Fennick wrote:

    No matter how much you
    try to be white you won’t.
    I’m sorry I have to break that to you.

    AP’s response:

    Once agan — we are not trying — in any
    way “to be white” (or any other sort of
    mono-racial, including that of full-Black)

    Why do you not seem to get it that —
    Mixed-Race is also a “racial” category
    — and that ‘White’ is *not* the only
    alternative to a person being ‘Black’?

    For the ka-billionth time — those of
    us who are both Mixed-Race and who
    refuse to hold our full-lineage in shame
    or secret — will also not allow ourselves
    to be “passed” off as either ‘White’ or as
    ‘Black’ (or any other sort of Mono-Racial).

    We Mixed-Race people are our own people
    — we are a separate group from any type
    of mono-racial people — and — if you
    could sonehome simply manage see beyond
    yourself for more than one moment —
    you would understand that ‘we’ both do
    and have the right to exist as who ‘we’
    are — as much as you do who you are.


    Keita Fennick wrote:

    There was a site called lightskinpeople.com
    … you should hook up with those people.

    AP’s response:

    The public acknowledgment and embracing of
    one’s full lineage via having a ‘Mixed-Race
    Identity’ is NOT about skin-coloring or tone
    — as, petty nonsense like that may be the
    obsession of certain Mono-Racial people
    — but it is not ours (despite the false,
    perception-based and jealousy-inspired
    myths continually spread about us by
    those same certain Mono-Racial people).

    Mixed-Race individuals and groups come any
    of a wide variety of skin colorings, tones,
    hues; facial features; hair textures; and
    body shapes, sizes and types — that
    there is actually not a singular
    ‘one’ description of Mixed-Race.

    This even includes people who are Mulattoes —
    as Mulattoes come in any variety of features
    — ranging in looks from people scuh as …
    Frederick Douglass, Lenny Kravitz, Rachel
    True, Samantha Mumba, Mel B (of the Spice
    Girls fame)— Lena Horne, Jayne Kennedy
    Overton; Freda Payne, Vanessa Williams —
    to Lonette McKee, Jennifer Beals, Wentworth
    Miller, Vin Deisel — as well as literally
    everything and everyone who is in-between.

    Therefore, there would be no point in trying
    to send any of us to a ‘light-skinned’ web
    site (and thus, falsely implying that due
    to our embrace of our full-lineage, we, thus,
    would automatically have to be ‘Colorists’)
    —- as, once again, any of us can proudly
    tell you that we all know for a fact that
    “Mixed (not “Black”) Comes In All Colors”

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1400
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/2241
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/3331
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1602

  25. Jennifer

    AP, I think I love you! ;D

  26. AP

    Thanks Jennifer! ;D

    And it’s good to see that someone else
    feels that we can be proud of who we
    are — as multiracials– and that we can
    also do so without feeling any need at
    all to deny or disdain any of the parts
    of our heritages or of that of others. 🙂

  27. Chance

    And it’s good to see that someone else
    feels that we can be proud of who we
    are — as multiracials– and that we can
    also do so without feeling any need at
    all to deny or disdain any of the parts
    of our heritages or of that of others. 🙂


    My response:
    I agree, we multi racials should embrace all of our heritages. And, we should never fell ashame of any of them.

  28. Renee

    Hello to all!

    I apologize in advance for any misspelled/missed words & etc.. I was rushing as I typed this! –I’m still at work and SHOULD HAVE been gone AN HOUR AGO!!! So again, sorry for any grammatical and spelling errors!

    First, I don’t know how I came across/found this site…in particular, this string of conversations. But I am glad I did! (I hope you guys don’t mind if I book mark it and peep in from time-to-time.)

    Next, and foremost I do wish you well and good luck with your movement to have a new category created for biracial/mixed-raced individuals. I, myself am not biracial. But I have many members from my extended family that are. Many have had to endure with hatred/jealousy from many communities, especially the Black one while growing up. Then once grown, they’ve always felt as though they had to deny one half of their heritage [parent] when accepting the other because of the current categories established. Or should I say because of the lack of, categories established. So again, best of luck and I do hope everything works out!
    …I know far too well how my “mono-racial” Black brothers and especially sisters can be towards those now labeled Black that are of the lighter and fairer hues based on the limited experiences “I’ve“ had. Again, I’m not biracial. Nor do I consider myself what’s referred to as an “MGM”. Then too, being right around the shade of peanut butter I don’t consider myself all that light either. But yet my experiences from [mainly] dark skinned Black women include:
    *Constantly being starred at so hard by my darker Black sisters, (complete strangers mind you) whenever I’m out in public….regardless of how I’m dressed/have my hair styled. In some instances, when it’s more than one, I have to pretend not to notice them “evily” (if that’s a word!) glaring at me else I risk the chance of getting into all out argument (or worse). –Been there, done that!
    *In some instances they [women & complete strangers] actually roll their eyes as I walk by.
    *In nasty tones I’ve been told dark skinned Black women I don’t wear real make up. I wear “Barbie” make up [lipstick & nail polish]. –I like pinks, roses and lavender/pink sheers.
    *I’ve been told by dark skinned Black women, in nasty tones “oh, when you’re your color, any make up looks good any way.”
    *Basically being treated as if I’m not “Black enough” by many co-workers. –I like being friends with whomever I enjoy being with that treat me “right”. So, I have friends that are White, Black and Asian.

    Sorry all, didn’t mean to get on a soapbox. I just got on a roll, and went !! But seriously, I just wanted to say that not all of us, “mono-racial” Blacks are against you. There are those of us that truly wish you all the best and hope that your movement is a success!! J

  29. Chance

    Renee,

    Thank you for your support, and I appreciate it. Regardless of how you look you can claim all of your ancestries, it is racist to keep try to force certain people to label themselves as black only, when they are clearly mixed with various ethnic and racial groups. One should respect all of their ancestries (mixes). Please do bookmark this site Renee, and I am doing some maintenance on it right now.

    Thank you, for coming by and please come by again.

  30. azizah

    Your writing is very interesting..and debatable..I belive the category boxes need to be eliminated. The mixed race box is there you just don’t see it. My entire family has been divided because of these issues within the same home some being invited to the passing side’s family reunions..the darker ones receiving a post card after the fact. I think its sick..and the ODR state of mind and being won’t end until each of us ends this foolish thinking one by one in our homes. I must say that I have been told I am not black enough by people who resemble Vanessa Williams and lighter with the same animosity from those who are ‘blue’black..because I have the hair of mixed race person..Its so stupid..people are people our minds tell our eyes what to see and how to register it.

  31. Chance

    @ azizah,

    You have made some good points, and thank you for coming by.

  32. Joseph

    Keita Fennick,

    I find it hard to read what you say and not get a little annoyed. You’re trying to put down mulattoes, but if you read up on your history, Black history, you will see that it is very much intermingled with mulatto history and often the leaders of the black people were mulattoes such as Frederick Douglas and all the way through the Civil Rights era. The Black Elite here in America were associated with light skin color because many of its members were mulattoes. Light skin is beautiful. If you do not like it fine but just as black is beautiful to “blacks” (generally speaking of course) light-skin is beautiful to mulattoes (generally speaking). There’s nothing wrong with endogamy qmong blacks, but when Mulattoes want to show love for other mulattoes over blacks this is a problem?

  33. Thassan

    This forum is very intresting, I whould never think or come a cross this kind of discussion,
    among Mulattoes, Unforunatly. Ive always had problems belonging especaliy in our African American Community.(Women) Im light complexted
    and have wavy hair, Some,” but, not all” Dark skined women seem to be very harsh towards, me especilly when they are around their man, or if i try out for a paticular position at a job. Some of them get to be intemidated. Just on the bases of how i look and what i know. It gets very tiring. Oh! and Keita, seems you got some self hatred going on within your self! and your taking it out on others.

  34. Jennifer

    To: “Joseph” and “Thassan” (#31 & 32)

    I agree with both of you 100%, and thank goodness we have this forum to express ourselves without being censored (as some other blogs often do)!

  35. Chance

    Thank all of you for commenting, and I try write about topics that people find interesting and topics that interest me too. I have noticed that mulatto (mixed race) topics are very popular here at this blog, and I will keep them coming.

    I am currently trying to think of a name for a mulatto/mixed race forum and website where commenters will be able to post topics themselves.

    The hard part for me is coming up with a domain name that is cool. I am still working on finding the right name once that is done it is on. We came get our mulatto on (mixed race).

  36. oneworld

    First, the placement of individuals into a particular racial category based upon complexion (or any other phenotypical characteristic) is, at the least, arbitrary. For AA’s light skinned does not equate with mixed-race (recent white/black ancestry), and mixed-race does not automatically beget light skin. I’m a MGM-mixed person with some recent asian admixture of the darker variety. Both sides of my family are very “multi-racial” looking with hair textures, and complexions spanning the spectrum, but they are ‘black’ and proud of it. From a strict humanist/scientist’s standpoint, I identify with people. Period. Although while growing up, due to the type of environment in which I was raised, (I’m a southerner) I considered myself black.

    Later on, my world (world-view) expanded, and I came to see myself as a member of only one race-the human race. Now, when given the option, (if not I don’t fret) I choose “other” or “multi-racial” on a form. For me, the term “multi-racial” is interchangeable with “human”. I have many reasons for thinking this way. The most important being: the explicit fact that this idea of “race” was socially constructed. Genetically, there is no good reason to believe that you, I, or any other person out there is any less than 99.9% identical. Out of ~ 27,000 genes there are only up to seven genes in our gene-pool that accounts for skin hue-one for skin color and the others for the intensity to which they are expressed. (ie. Ivory, Tan, olive, yellow, light brown, caramel, mocha, ebony…etc)
    Some of the so-called “advantages” (pretty yellow skin) or “disadvantages” (dark skin) are simply adaptations so as to survive in the changing environment.

    I think the time and energy some of you have devoted to arguing back and forth over the right to prefer dark or light could’ve been better spent. And, trust me, no matter how I disagree with your motives, I think both sides presented very real, impassioned reasons for thinking/feeling the way they do about this topic. However, most have their beginnings in mere fallacy. Not all light-skinned blacks are “uppity” and receive favorable treatment over darker-skinned blacks. There are a couple of studies out there on this very topic. Only a few support the widely held assumptions, with most showing that all blacks face a comparable amount of discrimination when it comes to race. Additionally, people who are experiencing undue animosity from others shouldn’t be quick to assume that it is stemming from a difference in complexion/nationality. (black, brown, yellow, or white) So, instead of becoming unraveled about having your “perceived” identity attacked, show some compassion. Try to put yourself in the other’s shoes. You may come out of it with a bruised ego, but it’s a large step in the direction of understanding.

    Indeed, it is perfectly natural for one to seek out those with whom you share certain commonalities, but if this leads you down a path of disrespect and division; be careful. This desire to be “separate but equal” resonates with the mentality of the pro-Jim Crow generation…

  37. Janise

    Well said, Oneworld. The type of separatism advocated by so many on this page really saddens me. Whether light-skinned or dark-skinned, if we are not pure white – whatever that is, aren’t we all just a shade of BROWN?

    I think Chance reveals his true feelings when he chose to label yellow skin “pretty”, while not ascribing a similar adjective to describe darker-skinned people. That type of ignorance saddens me also.

    Even basic reading of his arguments here and elsewhere on the website indicate that he is, to put it kindly, ill at ease with his black heritage. It seems he longs to be white because of all the (unfair) privilege that would bestow on him. He is convinced they, and their type of beauty, represents something genetically superior to black folk.

    Well, Chance, unless you go down the Michael Jackson route and surgically obliterate your African facial features, it ain’t gonna happen. It’s high time you embraced your black genes – after all, you wouldn’t exist without them!!

  38. Pretty Yellow

    Hey Janise! Guess what? “I am dedicated to all things bright & lovely. While there are more than enough cocoa-this and chocolate-that, there are not enough places for the bright pretties!” So handle it. ;D

  39. Joseph

    “but they are ‘black’ and proud of it”

    So why are you saying they are very multi-racial? Are they multi-racial or are they black? You seem like another black person trying to tell mixed people to just except the black and be black even though they are more than black and more than white even, another race different from the two, not in-between or lost between either or.

    “mixed-race does not automatically beget light skin”

    You are definately right about that. Mr. Obama is a clear depiction of that truth. Still, he is only partially black whether he chooses to identify with the black race or not.

    “instead of becoming unraveled about having your “perceived” identity attacked”

    But it is being attacked when people such as yourself suggest that we integrate into the black race, that we are black and not who we are. I consider myself a mulatto, I have a white father and a black mother. Her blackness does not make me black, and my father’s whiteness does not make me white.

    “Try to put yourself in the other’s shoes.”

    Speak for yourself buddy. Speak for yourself. You need to take a walk in those unfamiliar shoes.

    “This desire to be “separate but equal” resonates with the mentality of the pro-Jim Crow generation…”

    So now I cannot self-identify as a mulatto because YOU want me to identify as black since I have black ancestors? I’m not going to be forced to integrate into the black race because someone like you cannot see beyond your blinds. White America tried to do that already when they had the mulatto communities mix with the black communities many years ago and would put any mulatto in jail for a year who did not identify as black.

    “The type of separatism advocated by so many on this page really saddens me.”

    Janise this is foolish. So you want the white people to identify as black to since you believe all people originally originate from Africa? I’m not black, simple as that, if you can’t handle than don’t be jealous about it.

    “aren’t we all just a shade of BROWN”

    No. There are white looking mulattoes, Mestizos, there are Asians who are very white skinned as well. So you do not need to be caucasion to be light skinned, unless you are black.

    “It’s high time you embraced your black genes”

    To the renunciation of his white genes?

    “you wouldn’t exist without them”

    You seem to forget his other gene pool. The guy has two parents I am sure. I exist because of the union of my black mother and white father.

  40. Janise

    @ Joseph

    Joseph, my point is this: it is clear that Chance, like many others of his persuasion, are, at best, ill at ease with their black ancestry. That is because they have little knowledge of self. They have swallowed whole and internalised the negative myths and stereotypes of black people that plague the Americas.

    Of course you are free to call yourself what you want, or identify with whom you like, but, in turn, I am free to totally disregard it.

  41. Chance

    Janise Wrote:
    Tuesday, February 5, 2008 at 6:15 am –
    @ Joseph

    Joseph, my point is this: it is clear that Chance, like many others of his persuasion, are, at best, ill at ease with their black ancestry. That is because they have little knowledge of self. They have swallowed whole and internalised the negative myths and stereotypes of black people that plague the Americas.

    Of course you are free to call yourself what you want, or identify with whom you like, but, in turn, I am free to totally disregard it.

    My response: This is not true, I have have no problem with accepting my black ancestry. I have stated — that I accept all of my heritages and bloodlines. So stop making false allegations. Many blacks stereotype whites and whites stereotype blacks, and all racial groups stereotype each other.

    You can disregard and that is true. at the same time people can reject a label of simply calling themselves black only, and start calling themselves mixed race, and don’t forget that at this blog.

  42. Chance

    Joseph Wrote:
    Tuesday, February 5, 2008 at 2:12 am –

    my response: Joseph you stop like a king, and you intellectually broke it down thanks for that, I really appreciate it, and good looking out.

  43. Joseph

    Janise you speak about stereotypes but it seems to me that you have this stereotype that mulattoes, or any other person who is mixed with black ancestry lacks knowledge of self and rejects their black side. Maybe they reject ignorant blacks like you who are clearly speaking nonesense. It is true there are some mulattoes and people of other mixes with black decent who deny their black heritage. That is for various reasons of course. There are even black people who deny their black heritage or are ashamed of it. It is your brothers and sisters who I think you should be more concerned about when it comes to shame of their race than with mulattoes or other bi-racials.

    “They have swallowed whole and internalised the negative myths and stereotypes of black people that plague the Americas.”

    You have stereotypes about us mulattoes and some of us mulattoes have stereotypes about you black people. Stereotypes plague all people, or MOST people, because people like to believe the easy thing rather than research the truth of things. Mulattoes have been called a lost people, or in-between black and white, but mulattoes are their own race and they have had their own communities like the Jews, Blacks, and other racial groups do here in America.

    “Of course you are free to call yourself what you want”

    No doubt!

    “I am free to totally disregard it.”

    I do not need a black person’s approval to acknowledge who I really am, just like a white wo/man does not need a black person to acknowledge who they are. The eurasians have no problem identifying themselves as such but mulattoes get hell for it from the black people here. I just think it’s kind of funny how the ODR still affects your judgement. I am likewise free to disregard stupidity.

  44. Cee Cee

    Black folks need to stop referring to lightskin as being “pretty.” If your going to say that, then say darkskin is “pretty” also. Thats whats wrong with us a whole. We’ve become so brainwashed by european defintions of what is considered “pretty”, that we really begin to believe that lightskin automatically puts you in the “pretty” category.

  45. Chance

    @Cee Cee,

    Remember in the 1970s blacks had a saying that black is beautiful. Every ethnicity or people have some saying about the beauty of their phenotypes.

  46. Cee Cee

    @ Chance…I understand what you’re saying however, in our society people alaways want to equate “pretty” or attractive with someone who is of a lighter skin tone, as if to say “the lighter you are, the prettier you’re considered to be.” That is not what we should be teaching our children. I had a guy come up to me and tell me that I was pretty for a brown skinned girl! When I looked at him and said “that wasn’t a compliment”, he looked me like I was supposed to be thankful. Where do you think that frame of mind comes from?

  47. Chance

    # Cee Cee Wrote:
    Tuesday, February 19, 2008 at 6:26 am –

    @ Chance…I understand what you’re saying however, in our society people alaways want to equate “pretty” or attractive with someone who is of a lighter skin tone, as if to say “the lighter you are, the prettier you’re considered to be.” That is not what we should be teaching our children. I had a guy come up to me and tell me that I was pretty for a brown skinned girl! When I looked at him and said “that wasn’t a compliment”, he looked me like I was supposed to be thankful. Where do you think that frame of mind comes from?

    My response: It partially comes from having anybody with visible black ancestry being labeled black whether they like it or not. In other words African Americans have to many phenotypes (physical appearances) among them that are labeled black. This makes dark and too some degree caramel skin black skin tones lower. On top of that from what I see it is the blacks who are dark skin and caramel brown skin bur especially dark skin blacks who keep the colorism frustration going. They talk about it more and bring it more. I feel that it is because they don’t like their skin complexions. If you don’t want to have to deal with the problem then all they have to do is for a third category called mixed race or multiracial or both, and that will help solve part of that problem.

    When in 1999 multiracial organizations tried to get the office of budget and management to for a third category called multiracial – the NAACP stopped them. The NAACP said it would cause many African Americans to leave and go labeled themselves multiracial (mixed race). So the office of budget and management, the NAACP, and certain multiracial groups agreed to settle for you can mark as many racial categories as you like meaning you can check white, black, Asian, Native American, etc. This was not really good because it still makes you apart of some monoracial group.

    African Americans often get angry when African Americans who have mixed race phenotypes want to call themselves mixed race or some other name instead of black. Many of these African Americans who are caramel brown skin and dark skin especially dark skin don’t want to see pretty yellow, beige skin, or whitish skin African Americans get labeled mixed race or multiracial but yet they hate having these people their because they get more attention from dark skin and caramel brown black men and women.

    But yet they don’t want them to leave the African American race by way of being called mixed race. Therefore, African Americans see a superior benefit in having them there that outweighs them leaving. Jealousy is part of why they don’t want them to leave too. If people are really happy with how you look why complain? On top of that it is dark skin and certain caramel brown skin men and women who decide what is beautiful among African Americans phenotypically, not pretty yellow. Dark skin and caramel brown skin specifically caramel brown skin are the majority.

    They set the standard of what beauty is not light skin blacks. On top of that dark skin black men in general prefer light skin yellow and whiter looking mixed race women. And dark skin women even caramel brown skin women prefer light skin men.

    So the problem is not with pretty yellow skins it is with dark skin an caramel brown skin blacks themselves having many among them who don’t like their phenotypes. Light skin blacks are not deep in numbers when compared to caramel brown skin blacks. I’m not even sure light skin black men out number dark skin black men.

    They say African Americans of all skin colors are mixed in general, well that is true but yet many of them still have phenotypes that are sub Saharan African. Therefore, their mixture does not play a major role in their phenotypes (physical appearances). Certain caramel brown skin blacks have features about them that you now that they are mixed and these features play a role in their physical appearance. They get attention because of it. they are on the level of light skin blacks when it comes to being seen as mixed.

    I don’t have any African Americans of any skin complexion.

    I say embrace all that you are mixed with, regardless of your physically appearance. Even many dark skin blacks are mixed, African Americans need to embrace their mixed race ancestries and stop focusing one their black ancestry only. Even if in your phenotype – if you don’t show a lot of mixture you still have it. It is rare to find an African American regardless of skin tone who does not have admixture. Many of the African Americans do have admixture from other racial groups in their ancestral tree.

    I don’t mean to sound harsh so forgive me if I come across that way. I am go being strait forward and honest in my feelings an opinions.

  48. Renee

    Hi Chance! …Hello everyone!

    Chance your comment of:

    On top of that from what I see it is the blacks who are dark skin and caramel brown skin but especially dark skin blacks who keep the colorism frustration going. They talk about it more and bring it more. I feel that it is because they don’t like their skin complexions.

    …In my experiences, (and not saying this is the case with everyone else and/or their experiences), but I’ve found your statement above to be very true. –In the 20 plus years I’ve been in the working world, during all phases of my educational years (grade, middle & high school AND college)and current adult hood, whenever I hear “light-skin” vs. “dark-skin” complaints, I can honestly say it’s been my darker hued sisters complaining/kicking up the dust. Even given my experiences, I don’t feel that all are like that. But, whenever I’ve witnessed it, they’ve been the ones to do so.

    Again, based on my experiences, I honestly believe that due to the “stereo typed” imagery of what’s considered beautiful in our country…(fairer complexions, certain hair textures,type of nose and etc)somewhere in those deep down places we all have, that really hurts those blacks of the darker hue, especially the women. I think that imagery makes them feel “unpretty”. And what girl, young or old, does not want to feel pretty and accepted?

    On the other hand, do I feel this excuses/give them the right to take out their anger/hurt/ frustrations on others, who, like themselves, have no control over how they were born? Certainly, not!! But again, as I pointed out in my initial posting on Jan 15th, it still does.

    Chance, very good points in your (entire) post!

    …see ya!! ^_^

  49. Chance

    Hey Renee,

    Thanks for sharing that, you have seen these things in public for yourself.

    Thanks for commenting and sharing Renee.

  50. Cee Cee

    The point I am trying to make is black people need to stop equating lightskin with beauty. Beauty comes in all shades. I’ve seen black folks who treat lighter skinned children, different than darker skinned children, just based on skin tone. Which is totally ridiculous. I’ve seen women put on television shows and in music videos because she was lightskinned, but clearly the darkerskinned girl was “prettier”, but because the other one was “light”, she gets picked for the part. Black folks are still suffering with the “brown paper bag” syndrome. When will it stop?

  51. Chance

    Cece wrote: When will it stop?

    My response: No it will not stop, as long as blacks who are dark skin continue to feel that their skin color is unattractive. Like I said it is mainly Dark skin blacks who keep the skin color thing going.
    Like I said the problem is that too many people with different phenotypes are labeled black when they are not black in phenotype. One of the things dark skin blacks can do is help mixed race people establish a third category called multiracial or mixed race. So the skin color thing will never stop until dark skin blacks start liking themselves.

    The black folks who equate light skin with beauty are dark skin blacks themselves,, and yet they complain about light skin being seen as beautiful but they are the ones in the black race who push the idea of light skin being beautiful.

  52. Cee Cee

    No, I totally disagree. Some darkskinned people have a complex about themselves due to the ignorance of our people. Darkskin people were not the ones who came up with the whole “Brown paper bag” thing. We both know of how some college sororities did not allow “sister’s” who were darker than a brown paper bag to pledge. How ridiculous is that? How do you expect people to feel good about themseleves when their own people are mistreating them? As I said before black people need to get rid of this color complex that has been embeded in them since slavery.

  53. Chance

    @ Cee Cee,

    You are not giving much of a strong intellectual argument, I told you once before that too many people are labeled black and this is the real problem. Combined with many darker blacks disliking being born dark skin. People who have the same phenotype have the right to associate with people who look like them. There is nothing wrong with that. All racial groups do it. Mixed race looking people have the same right. So do dark skin blacks. Please go back and read my responses to you.

    If a group of dark skin blacks opened up a sorority for their on skin color they have that right.

    Yes we do need to get rid of colorism.

  54. Cee Cee

    Why should people create a sorority or any group for that matter based on skin complexion? That is IGNORANT. If anyone wants to associate with a certain group based on skin tone is a foolish individual, who is paying way too much attention to what they look like. Please folks, lets get over ourseleves. But anyway, If you are from a mixed background, I do not believe that you should be considered “black.” I think you should be able to label yourself whatever you want, however in this society people judge you based on what your physical appearance. They could care less about your white great grandmother on your father’s side.

  55. Cee Cee

    Anytime we begin to seperate each other according to skin tone, we create annimosity between a group of people. This often happens in the black and latino community. Because there are so many different shades in these two groups, you have some people who feel because their skin tone is closer to white, that they are entitled to something or are “better” than others. If you think I’m lying just observe how lighter skinned puerto ricans living in puerto rico are treated and the “black” puerto ricans are treated. It is totally uncalled for.

  56. Denise

    This whole argument is rediculous. If you want to identify yourself as green, so what go ahead just be respectful of other complexions and phenotypes.

    Life experiences is the catalyst for racial identity.The reason why so many lighter skinned individuals consider themselves more attractive(hence, the origin of term “high” yellow), is because so many darker skinned blacks, place them on a pedestal. So many light skinned persons are told by darker skinned blacks that they have a pretty skin complexion and “good” hair, because of this, jealousy and hatred was experienced by lighter skinned individuals, which is absolutley slave.

    The term black and beautiful and yellow and pretty, are both offensive terms that celebrate racial inferiority. We are all beautifully human; God has given us all distinct phenotypes and skin colors. If everyone was the same race and of the same culture, this world would be so boring.

    Each race has their beauty: Blacks have an advantage with aging, yes, “Black don’t crack”, White people and people with white ancestry are likely to have aged skin at a faster rate because of melanin. People of African descent also have nicer body features on average, such a larger buttocks, larger eyes and fuller lips-no collagen needed. White people have softer textures of hair, darker more defined eyebrows, and smoother skin. Native American/Alaskan native people have more defined facial features, such as high cheekbones, in addition they have beautiful black hair.

    On the Contrary,Bi/multi ethnic people, are a mixture of all of these beautiful features, so therefore considered more attractive by most individuals.

  57. Thetruthis

    Both of Venessa Williams parents are black, her hair is nappy and short and her eyes are not blue, they are green. real facts




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